Saturday, September 20, 2014
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Bromo-DragonFLY

bomodragonflyBromo-DragonFLY is Unscheduled in the United States. It is a gray area in the law because it may be illegal under the federal analog act.

Addictive Potential: Unknown

Emergency Room Visits Yearly: Unknown

Mandatory Minimum Sentence: Unknown

Mechanism of Action: 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptor agonist

Overview:

Bromo-DragonFLY, or 1-(8-bromobenzo[1,2-b;4,5-b’]difuran-4-yl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. It is considered an extremely potent hallucinogen, only slightly less potent than LSD. Although the exact dosage is still unknown, a normal dose is reported by users to be in the range of 200 μg to 800 μg. It has an extremely long duration of action up to 1-3 days. The subjective effects of Bromo-DragonFly are reported to be somewhat similar to LSD (Coppola et al., 2012). Erowid (2010) noted that the positive effects of Bromo-DragonFLY can include visual changes, increased energy, increased associative thinking, and ego softening.

At present, none of the FLY compounds are formally controlled in the United States. However, their core structures are highly similar to the Schedule I hallucinogens 2C-B and DOB. For this reason, they could potentially be prosecuted under the Federal Analog Act.

Substance Identification:

       Marquis Reagent      Mecke Reagent 
Bromo-DragonFLY Black/Purple  Green to Purple

(Info provided by EcstasyData, 2009)

Side Effects & Adverse Reactions:

There is limited empirical data about the side effects, adverse reactions, long-term damage, and/or addiction potential of Bromo-DragonFLY. According to Coppola et al. (2012), some of the potential negative effects include:

  • prolonged hallucinations and euphoria
  • flashback
  • anxiety
  • severe insomnia
  • headache
  • nausea
  • diarrhea
  • sweating
  • tightness, twitches, and muscle tension
  • confusion
  • memory alterations
  • delusions
  • paranoid ideation

Remember, research chemicals are experimental chemicals that are not approved for human consumption. This is because not enough data exists currently about their effects in humans. Although some people are willing to ingest the research chemical Bromo-DragonFLY, it is unreasonable to assume that it is in any way safe to use recreationally.

Deaths & Overdoses:

At least three reports of deaths are believed to have resulted from Bromo-DragonFLY in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Also, a Swedish man had to have the front part of his feet and several fingers on one hand amputated after taking a massive overdose. Apparently the compound acted as a long-acting efficacious vasoconstrictor, leading to necrosis and gangrene which was delayed by several weeks after the overdose occurred. Several other cases have also been reported of severe peripheral vasoconstriction following overdose with Bromo-DragonFLY (Erowid, 2008).

Bromo-DragonFLY Videos:

Research:

Other Informational Resources:

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