Sunday, March 26, 2017
Breaking News

Nelumbo nucifera

nelumbo_nuciferaNelumbo nucifera is Uncontrolled in the United States, however, it is not approved for human consumption.

Addictive Potential: Unkown

Emergency Room Visits Yearly: Unkown

Mandatory Minimum Sentence: Unknown

Mechanism of Action: Unknown

Overview:

Nelumbo nucifera, known by a number of names including Indian lotus, sacred lotus, bean of India, or simply lotus. Botanically, Nelumbo nucifera (Gaertn.) may also be referred to by its former names, Nelumbium speciosum (Wild.) or Nymphaea nelumbo. It is often confused with Nymphaea caerulea, also known as the Egyptian blue lily or sacred blue lily.

A common misconception is referring to the lotus as a water-lily (Nymphaea), an entirely different plant as can be seen from the centre of the flower, which clearly lacks the structure that goes on to form the distinctive circular seed pod in the Nelumbo nucifera.

From ancient times the lotus has been a divine symbol in Asian traditions representing sexual purity, a virtue. Hindus revere it with the gods Vishnu, Brahma, and the goddesses Lakshmi and Sarasvati. Often used as an example of divine beauty, Vishnu is often described as the ‘Lotus-Eyed One’. Its unfolding petals suggest the expansion of the soul. The growth of its pure beauty from the mud of its origin holds a benign spiritual promise. Particularly Brahma and Lakshmi, the divinities of potency and wealth, have the lotus symbol associated with them. In Hindu iconography, deities often are depicted with lotus flowers as their seats. Borrowing from Hinduism, in Buddhist symbolism the lotus again represents purity of the body, speech, and mind as if floating above the muddy waters of attachment and desire. It is also to be noted that most Buddhist, Chinese, Hindu, Japanese, amongst other Asian deities are often are depicted as seated on a lotus flower. According to legend, Gautama Buddha was born with the ability to walk and everywhere he stepped, lotus flowers bloomed. Drawing in turn on these beliefs, the international Bahá’í community adopted this symbolism in the design of the Lotus Temple in New Delhi, India.

According to Bouncing Bear Botanicals (2009), “Nelumbo nucifera was often smoked or made into a tea with the idea that it would create a feeling of joy that permeated the mind and body.”

Pharmacology (from The Pharmacology of Chinese Herbs) :

Research:

E-books:

Traditional Lotus Wine: A Manual on Preparation and Effects

Leave a Reply