Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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Ololiuhqui

rivea_corymbosa_picOloliuhqui is Uncontrolled in the United States, however, it is not approved for human consumption. This is a gray area of the law because the seeds contain, LSA, which is a Schedule III.

Addictive Potential: None

Emergency Room Visits Yearly: Unknown

Mandatory Minimum Sentence: None

Mechanism of Action: Partial agonist of the serotonin receptors

Overview:

Ololiuhqui (Rivea corymbosa), is native throughout Latin America from Mexico in the North to Peru in the South and widely naturalised elsewhere. It is a perennial climbing vine with white flowers, often planted as an ornamental plant. This plant also occurs in Cuba, where it usually blooms from early December to February. Its flowers secrete copious amount of nectar, and the honey the bees make from it is very clear and aromatic. It is considered one of the main honey plants from the island.

Known to natives of Mexico as Ololiúqui (also spelled ololiuhqui or ololiuqui), its seeds, while little known outside of Mexico, were perhaps the most common entheogen used by the natives. The Nahuatl word ololiuhqui means “round thing”, and refers to the small, brown, oval seeds of the morning glory, not the plant itself, which is called coaxihuitl, “snake-plant”, in Nahuatl, and hiedra or bejuco in the Spanish language. The seeds, in Spanish, are sometimes called semilla de la Virgen (seeds of the Virgin Mary).

Ololiuhqui (Rivea corymbosa) seeds contain LSA (d-lysergic acid amide), a precursor to LSD. The seeds are generally eaten, although there are a variety of preparation methods used. The active oral dosage ranges from 60 – 100 seeds and lasts from 4 to 8 hours.

Side Effects and Adverse Reactions:

As with Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds, some users commonly report experiencing anxiety, nausea, gas, vomiting, and abdominal cramps. Delirium, dizziness, confusion, paranoia, fear, and panic are less common, but sometimes experienced with higher doses.

Research:

Hallucinogens and dissociative agents naturally growing in the United States

Teonanácatl and Ololiuqui, two ancient magic drugs of Mexico

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